Very odd: a 20g Charles Jones “Flint-Cusssion” SxS shotgun…

20g Charles Jones "Flint-Cusssion" SxS shotgun. Image courtesy Pembroke Fine Arms
20g Charles Jones “Flint-Cusssion” SxS shotgun. Image courtesy Pembroke Fine Arms

Getting a shotgun or rifle to fire has always been tricky, and since the earliest day of firearms, makers have come up with countless ways to make a gun go bang.

At the beginning of the 19th century, most handheld shotguns and rifles used flintlocks to ignite their pcharges. But in 1807, the Reverend Alexander John Forsyth developed the percussion method and changed everything.

By the 1820s, Forsyth’s system had evolved into percussion caps, which were ideal for sporting guns. Simple to use, reliable in almost any weather, and quick to fire, the percussion cap’s perfection marked the end for flintlocks and the way forward to the next generation of firearms – the centerfires.

The firearm you see here is sort of the platypus of shotguns. Part percussion and part flintlock, it looks like it was made to handle whatever shooting situation a hunter might find himself in.

20g Charles Jones "Flint-Cusssion" SxS shotgun. Image courtesy Pembroke Fine Arms
20g Charles Jones “Flint-Cusssion” SxS shotgun. Image courtesy Pembroke Fine Arms

20g Charles Jones “Flint-Cusssion” SxS shotgun: This is a rare and exceptional experimental dual ignition shotgun made by Charles Jones circa 1835 who was the Gunmaker to HRH Prince Albert.  This is a 20 bore muzzle loading gun with an interruption switch to block the platinum lined flintlock touch hole to fire percussion caps. Overall length is 45″ with 28.5″ barrels and LOP 14.5″. The gun has definitive London Black Powder proofs and features a wrist escuthcheon with the initials “CJ”. Possibly an experimental shotgun or a commissioned piece to offer a “belt and braces” approach to the “new” percussion caps and would offer the traveller a solution to travelling overseas where percussion caps might be difficult to acquire. The quality of workmanship is superb. Price: $18,250

Pics Courtesy of Pembroke Fine Arms

20g Charles Jones "Flint-Cusssion" SxS shotgun. Image courtesy Pembroke Fine Arms
20g Charles Jones “Flint-Cusssion” SxS shotgun. Image courtesy Pembroke Fine Arms
20g Charles Jones "Flint-Cusssion" SxS shotgun. Image courtesy Pembroke Fine Arms
20g Charles Jones “Flint-Cusssion” SxS shotgun. Image courtesy Pembroke Fine Arms
20g Charles Jones "Flint-Cusssion" SxS shotgun. Image courtesy Pembroke Fine Arms
20g Charles Jones “Flint-Cusssion” SxS shotgun. Image courtesy Pembroke Fine Arms
20g Charles Jones "Flint-Cusssion" SxS shotgun. Image courtesy Pembroke Fine Arms
20g Charles Jones “Flint-Cusssion” SxS shotgun. Image courtesy Pembroke Fine Arms

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3 thoughts on “Very odd: a 20g Charles Jones “Flint-Cusssion” SxS shotgun…

  1. And there it is folks…The world’s first “hybrid”!

    What a whirling dervish of a gun…Actually a pretty dang’d novel concept: Forgot your percussion caps / ran out?…No problem, just top off the pans and keep plugging away!

    This thing belongs in a museum, or at least should be on display at “Ripley’s”.

    It’s actually quite a value and should get snapped-up pretty quickly!

    JW

  2. Hi
    Thanks for featuring my Jones dual ignition shotgun. If I wasn’t married with kids and grand kids I wouldn’t be selling it !!
    I sell and collect the obscure as I have no interest in high volume, “no interest pay the bank loan” kind of stuff. Most of my items never reach my website and I have some rarities on the way such as a Le Page Saw handled pistol ( he never made one according to the books) Kerr double barreled shotgun, Mortimer saw handled duelling pistol,Gewehr anti tank rifle and a bravery certificate from the battle of Trafalgar.
    I’ll stop now as this is looking like a commercial for pembroke fine arms. Great site, great people.
    Thanks
    Dave

  3. Dave-

    You’re welcome. I hope it helped you out. It sure was an interesting gun. I saw a Manton that was made as both a percussion & flint, but it came with separate barrels & locks for each set up. I’ve never seen both combined in one design. Have you ever fired the gun?

    Gregg

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