What’s better: neutering at 6 months or holding off?

From the 8/20/14 issue of Sporting Classics Daily
From the 8/20/14 issue of Sporting Classics Daily

One of the first questions my vet asked me when he saw Lexi was: When would you like to bring her in and have her spayed? When he found out that I was planning on holding off, he asked if I planned to breed her

“Not necessarily,” I said.

My breeder suggested holding off on spaying, and I’m reading more studies that indicate that doing it may be wise.

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Gundogs: To Neuter or Not to Neuter?

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Gundogs: To Neuter or Not to Neuter?

Tom Davis just published a piece called  Gundogs: To Neuter or Not to Neuter? in the 8/20/14 issue of Sporting Classic Daily. It does a good job of laying out both sides of the story. If you have a young dog, I suggest checking it out.

Here a few more resources to look at, too:

Long-Term Health Risks and Benefits Associated with Spay / Neuter in Dogs

Basis for Position on Mandatory Spay-Neuter in the Canine and Feline

According to a mounting body of evidence, the practice of neutering at an early age may increase a dog’s risk for developing a laundry list of serious health problems. In particular, neutering prior to the attainment of sexual maturity has been linked to a higher incidence of hip dysplasia, canine cruciate ligament (CCL) injury, hypothyroidism, geriatric cognitive impairment, and certain cancers, including lymphoma, osteosarcoma, and hemangiosarcoma. – See more at: http://sportingclassicsdaily.com/issue/august-2014/article/gundogs-to-neuter-or-not-to-neuter#sthash.TrwIjTZR.dpuf

According to a mounting body of evidence, the practice of neutering at an early age may increase a dog’s risk for developing a laundry list of serious health problems. In particular, neutering prior to the attainment of sexual maturity has been linked to a higher incidence of hip dysplasia, canine cruciate ligament (CCL) injury, hypothyroidism, geriatric cognitive impairment, and certain cancers, including lymphoma, osteosarcoma, and hemangiosarcoma. – See more at: http://sportingclassicsdaily.com/issue/august-2014/article/gundogs-to-neuter-or-not-to-neuter#sthash.TrwIjTZR.dpuf
According to a mounting body of evidence, the practice of neutering at an early age may increase a dog’s risk for developing a laundry list of serious health problems. In particular, neutering prior to the attainment of sexual maturity has been linked to a higher incidence of hip dysplasia, canine cruciate ligament (CCL) injury, hypothyroidism, geriatric cognitive impairment, and certain cancers, including lymphoma, osteosarcoma, and hemangiosarcoma. – See more at: http://sportingclassicsdaily.com/issue/august-2014/article/gundogs-to-neuter-or-not-to-neuter#sthash.TrwIjTZR.dpuf
According to a mounting body of evidence, the practice of neutering at an early age may increase a dog’s risk for developing a laundry list of serious health problems. In particular, neutering prior to the attainment of sexual maturity has been linked to a higher incidence of hip dysplasia, canine cruciate ligament (CCL) injury, hypothyroidism, geriatric cognitive impairment, and certain cancers, including lymphoma, osteosarcoma, and hemangiosarcoma. – See more at: http://sportingclassicsdaily.com/issue/august-2014/article/gundogs-to-neuter-or-not-to-neuter#sthash.TrwIjTZR.dpuf
According to a mounting body of evidence, the practice of neutering at an early age may increase a dog’s risk for developing a laundry list of serious health problems. In particular, neutering prior to the attainment of sexual maturity has been linked to a higher incidence of hip dysplasia, canine cruciate ligament (CCL) injury, hypothyroidism, geriatric cognitive impairment, and certain cancers, including lymphoma, osteosarcoma, and hemangiosarcoma. – See more at: http://sportingclassicsdaily.com/issue/august-2014/article/gundogs-to-neuter-or-not-to-neuter#sthash.TrwIjTZR.dpuf

According to a mounting body of evidence, the practice of neutering at an early age may increase a dog’s risk for developing a laundry list of serious health problems. In particular, neutering prior to the attainment of sexual maturity has been linked to a higher incidence of hip dysplasia, canine cruciate ligament (CCL) injury, hypothyroidism, geriatric cognitive impairment, and certain cancers, including lymphoma, osteosarcoma, and hemangiosarcoma. – See more at: http://sportingclassicsdaily.com/issue/august-2014/article/gundogs-to-neuter-or-not-to-neuter#sthash.TrwIjTZR.dpuf
According to a mounting body of evidence, the practice of neutering at an early age may increase a dog’s risk for developing a laundry list of serious health problems. In particular, neutering prior to the attainment of sexual maturity has been linked to a higher incidence of hip dysplasia, canine cruciate ligament (CCL) injury, hypothyroidism, geriatric cognitive impairment, and certain cancers, including lymphoma, osteosarcoma, and hemangiosarcoma. – See more at: http://sportingclassicsdaily.com/issue/august-2014/article/gundogs-to-neuter-or-not-to-neuter#sthash.TrwIjTZR.dpuf

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2 thoughts on “What’s better: neutering at 6 months or holding off?

  1. I had never spayed a dog before this one and I would never do it again. I have read that tubal ligation might be a better solution. My dog (a vizsla) and my third one, is incontinent. I don’t think she has the hunting desire of my other two vizslas. I love her but that was a mistake. She’s a great dog. Don’t make the same mistake. Good luck

  2. My pointer Puck was incontinent her last few years. She was spayed, too, but it was done when she was around 2 years old.

    Thanks

    Gregg

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