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Tag Archive '16 gauge'

Pre-war Boss 20 ga., 26-1/2″ barrels: Choked improved cylinder and modified (.007/.010).  Original 2-3/4 1oz. heavy proof. Raised concave game rib marked “Boss & Co. 41 Albermarle Street Picadilly London W”.  Built with the style and grace that these “golden era” Boss guns are famous for.  The petite “easy opening” action gun weighs a mere […]

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I’ve raved about Webley & Scott’s Model 700 shotguns a bunch of times. Rugged and dependable, the M700 was introduced in the 1950s as an entry-level shotgun and it went of to become one of the most popular side-by-sides ever made. While 12 gauge Model 700s are easy to find, 16 gauges are not. The […]

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I used to be hot for Lefevers – especially ones in 16 gauge.  I owned three F-grades 16s at one point, including one that was practically new. These days, my passion for Uncle Dan’s doubles has cooled a bit. But I have to say, the Lefever you see here does get my heart pumping. Its […]

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Here’s a shotgun that a lot of guys are looking: A 16 gauge A.H. Fox Sterlingworth with 28″ barrels. This one looks like it’s in decent shape. It’s up for auction now, and it will be interesting to see just how high the price goes. The listing ends Sunday, February 23 @18:02 PT. Here’s the […]

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Here’s proof that you don’t have to spend a lot of money to get a nice double barrel shotgun. The Manufrance Robust is good, solid shotgun, built on an Anson & Deeley style boxlock action. The one you see here looks pretty much new. It even has it’s original retractable leather sling – a pretty […]

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Take a good look at the 16g Parker double you see here. I bet it will be gone soon – and for good reason. As a 16 gauge on a O frame, it’s hard to find and one of the best grouse guns ever made in America. It also has excellent dimensions, with just 2″ […]

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In New England, a ruffed grouse is called a pa’tridge. I don’t know why. There’s always one gauge I associate with pa’tridge hunting: the 16. I don’t know why this is, either. Sixteen gauges have been around forever, but they’ve been very popular. The British never loved them, at least not as breechloading centerfires. It […]

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Of all the A.H. Fox Sterlingworth shotguns ever made, the model you see here is one of the hardest to find.  The Sterlingworth Skeet and Upland Game Gun was introduced in 1935. Skeet was new sport then, having been invented in 1920 by Charles Davis, a grouse hunter from Andover, MA. In 1926, William Harnden […]

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We live in an off-the-rack world. But you’re one of a kind, right? So sometimes it’s nice to have something that’s made just for you. I think that explains some of the popularity behind upgraded and customized classic American shotguns. Gunsmiths like Dewey Vicknair and Dennis Potter have earned a following for this kind of […]

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The A.H. Fox Sterlingworth  was one of the most practical doubles ever made in America. Rugged and affordable, it was a reliable SxS that gave hunters everything they needed at a great price. Wise Americans recognized this and made the Sterlingworth a huge success. But of the 100,000+ Sterlies made, none of the ones I’ve […]

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