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Tag Archive 'damascus'

I’ve written a lot about Charles Daly shotguns — and for good reason. Up until the mid-1930s, Daly shotguns were some of the finest doubles sold in the US. Charles Daly was a businessman, not a gunmaker. Around 1875 he partnered with August Shoverling to import shotguns into the United States. These side-by-sides were marketed under […]

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Here’s a shotgun I’ve always wanted: a 16g Parker DH with a straight grip and damascus barrels. This one popped up on Gunsinternational.com on Tuesday. I must of spent half an hour looking it over, examining the pics, reading the description, and wondering if I had finally found one of my dream guns. At first […]

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I don’t like to sell my shotguns, especially if it’s one I’ve had for a while. Once I’ve had a double for a few seasons, we’ve been places together and shared time. I remember slipping it out of its case at the beginning of hope-filled October days and breaking it down as I remember the […]

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It seems odd now, but 150 years ago the “hammerless” centerfire shotgun was a novel design. London’s Theophilus Murcott patented one in 1871, followed by Westley Richards in 1875. Over here in the US, Daniel Myron Lefever patented his lever-cocking, hammerless design in 1878. Soon after him,  Charles Sneider came out with the design you […]

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I like the old and impractical: bamboo fly rods…wooden decoys…books…and, of course, double-barrel shotguns — especially hammer guns with damascus barrels. From about 1866-1875, centerfire hammer guns were the latest-and-greatest thing in the shooting world. Once they were introduced, hunters from the moors of Scotland to the Susquehanna flats tossed aside their slow-to-load percussion guns […]

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The sixteen was never America’s favorite gauge  Even though all our makers built 16s, the gauge that was most popular with us was the twelve. There’s a simple reason for this: versatility. Most American shooters were opportunistic. They shot everything from waterfowl to rabbits and upland game. A twelve could handle all this action. But […]

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Little John’s Auction Service annual May antique and sporting guns auction starts this Wednesday. If you’re into nice doubles, this is a sale you don’t want to miss. It’s a big auction, spread out over 2 days – Wednesday & Thursday, May 22-23. I’m going to put up several posts featuring the highlights of this […]

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The title “gunmaker” has always had always had a broad definition, especially here in America. Some of our gunmakers did make shotguns and rifles from scratch (or mostly from scratch). But others bought parts from overseas and then assembled, stocked, and finished off the firearm over here. Many more American “gunmakers” were retailers who had […]

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Parker Bros. was one of America’s oldest, largest, and most innovative gun makers. From 1869 to 1942, the company turned out over 240,000+ shotguns. The one you see is built on the Parker Lifter-Action, one of the company’s earliest designs. It’s an A-grade, and it was the top-of-line Parker back when it was made in […]

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Here’s a great looking hammergun that just hit the market. It’s a 100+ year old J.P. Sauer & Sohn, and it looks like it’s in super original condition. Check out all the color on the action and the great figure in the French walnut stock, too. With its cheekpiece, sling swivels, and horn triggerguard, this […]

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