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Tag Archive 'Gunmaker'

Birmingham, England, used to be one of the world’s largest gunmaking towns. Thousands of people used to be employed by the trade there, and all kinds of makers had shops or factories in and around the city. William Ford was one of these makers. William Ford rose to prominence in the late 1870s as a […]

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William & Son isn’t London’s most oldest or most famous gunmaker. But they are one of its best, and in this video you can see a bit of what goes into making one of their side-by-side shotguns. Here’s a bit about these guns from the Chairman & Founder, William Asprey: “..These are truly the ultimate […]

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Vintage British boxlocks are some of the best deals in the gun world- especially ones like this 12g Anson & Deeley-style by W.J. Jeffrey. William Jackman Jeffery started out in the gun trade in the mid 1800s. By the time the century closed, he had his own business in London. He was an inventive man […]

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Someone needs to buy this great looking Scottish side-by-side right away. This gun was made for Charles Ingram Gunmakers, of Waterlook St. Glasgow– a business that began in 1835 — and it looks like it has a lot of original finish. I love the scroll engraving and the reddish cast of the wood, too. This […]

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Own a best-quality British shotgun? Here’s the perfect place to store it. The rare James Woodward & Sons shotgun cases below are on Ebay now. Both are being offered at No Reserve. Brady and other companies in the UK built cases like these for Woodward, Westley Richards, Purdey, and other makers. When a customer ordered […]

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No — that’s not a typo, and the price shown is not missing a zero. Here’s is a 20 gauge James Woodward & Son sidelock side-by-side shotgun for just $3,000. But of course there’s a catch: this double barrel is missing its forend. This gun was made around 1896. For some reason, it looks like […]

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George Gibbs is a gunmaker we don’t hear a lot about today. Even though he helped design one of the most successful hammerless shotguns of the 19th century, and his son partnered with William Metford to create one of the finest falling-block rifles of the 1870 and 1880s, you would be hard pressed to find […]

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When you think of “British” doubles, London and Birmingham are the cities that usually come to mind. Many of the UK’s top gunmakers worked in and around those cities for over two-hundred years. But top gunmakers were also located in other parts of the country for almost as long. John Dickson & Son built their […]

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Here’s another nice double barrel shotgun coming up tomorrow, 3/8, @ Poulin’s auction. It’s a W. & C Scott, with a ton of original condition and — amazingly — its original hang tag and case. W. & C Scott was founded in 1840 by brothers William & Charles, and their company went on to become […]

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I often think of Birmingham and London as the centers of the UK’s double-barrel shotgun trade. Of course, both cities did make significant contributions to the history of gunmaking, but Edinburgh also played a important role. James MacNaughton opened a shop in Edinburgh in 1864 and in 1879 he patented his triggerplate-action ‘Edinburgh Patent Hammerless […]

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