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Tag Archive 'Gunmaker'

Someone needs to buy this great looking Scottish side-by-side right away. This gun was made for Charles Ingram Gunmakers, of Waterlook St. Glasgow– a business that began in 1835 — and it looks like it has a lot of original finish. I love the scroll engraving and the reddish cast of the wood, too. This […]

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Own a best-quality British shotgun? Here’s the perfect place to store it. The rare James Woodward & Sons shotgun cases below are on Ebay now. Both are being offered at No Reserve. Brady and other companies in the UK built cases like these for Woodward, Westley Richards, Purdey, and other makers. When a customer ordered […]

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No — that’s not a typo, and the price shown is not missing a zero. Here’s is a 20 gauge James Woodward & Son sidelock side-by-side shotgun for just $3,000. But of course there’s a catch: this double barrel is missing its forend. This gun was made around 1896. For some reason, it looks like […]

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George Gibbs is a gunmaker we don’t hear a lot about today. Even though he helped design one of the most successful hammerless shotguns of the 19th century, and his son partnered with William Metford to create one of the finest falling-block rifles of the 1870 and 1880s, you would be hard pressed to find […]

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When you think of “British” doubles, London and Birmingham are the cities that usually come to mind. Many of the UK’s top gunmakers worked in and around those cities for over two-hundred years. But top gunmakers were also located in other parts of the country for almost as long. John Dickson & Son built their […]

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Here’s another nice double barrel shotgun coming up tomorrow, 3/8, @ Poulin’s auction. It’s a W. & C Scott, with a ton of original condition and — amazingly — its original hang tag and case. W. & C Scott was founded in 1840 by brothers William & Charles, and their company went on to become […]

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I often think of Birmingham and London as the centers of the UK’s double-barrel shotgun trade. Of course, both cities did make significant contributions to the history of gunmaking, but Edinburgh also played a important role. James MacNaughton opened a shop in Edinburgh in 1864 and in 1879 he patented his triggerplate-action ‘Edinburgh Patent Hammerless […]

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Boston isn’t a city we think of as gun friendly. But in the 19th and early 20th century, it was home to a number of famous gunmakers, including William R. Schaefer. Wm R. Schaefer started making percussion guns around 1853. By 1883, his sons had joined the business and they were making custom shotguns and […]

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The side-by-side shotgun you see here is probably one of kind. It’s a Best-quality 28 gaugeĀ  made by James Woodward & Sons, London, in 1940 Woodward started making guns in 1874 and ceased in 1948 when they sold their business to James Purdey & Sons. In the seventy-six years they made firearms, two of their […]

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The doubel barrel shotgun you see here is a head scratcher. While it sure looks like a Lefever and it’s made on a Lefever-pushlever-patent action, it was made by J.A. Prechtel. Who was J.A. Prechtel? I have no idea, and neither does anyone else. According to the inscription on the barrels, Prechtel was located in […]

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