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Tag Archive 'Hunter Arms'

Here’s a hard-to-find vintage American double in fantastic original condition. It’s a 20 gauge L.C. Smith Trap Grade, and it’s up for auction now at Gunrunnerauctions.com. If you collect Elsies, bid now. I doubt you’ll see a better one of these any time soon. According to the L.C. Smith website, Hunter Arms Co. made 3346 Trap-grade […]

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Twelve-gauge, L.C. Smith No. 2s are not hard guns find– unless you’re looking for an example with the kind of condition you see here. Hunter Arms made 10,815 of them from 1890-1914, and according to the L.C. Smith Collector’s site, they turned out the one you see here in 1899. Yeah, 1899. That’s before Ford introduced […]

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GREENER 360 NO. 2 EJECTOR SxS DOUBLE RIFLE: Exceptionally fine condition this Anson & Deeley boxlock Ejector Greener Double Rifle was made in 1928 and remains in exceptional condition. The Trigger guard is engraved: “GRADE R.E.H.T. 60” Chambered for the .360 #2, 3” it has great bores and the previous owner reports excellent accuracy. The gun […]

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High-grade L.C. Smith are some of the best-looking doubles ever made in America. Check out this 16g Crown grade to see why. The Hunter Arms Company made the Crown from 1912-1950, and when it was first introduced it to replaced the company’s No. 5 grade. Crown grades were available in four gauges –  10, 12, 16, and 20 – […]

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I don’t like to sell my shotguns, especially if it’s one I’ve had for a while. Once I’ve had a double for a few seasons, we’ve been places together and shared time. I remember slipping it out of its case at the beginning of hope-filled October days and breaking it down as I remember the […]

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If classic American doubles are your thing, here are two nice ones to check out. This first shotgun is a 12 gauge L.C. Smith No. 2. According the L.C. Smith Collector’s Association, “The No. 2 grade was nicely finished and engraved… and was said to be “just the kind for rough usage.” The Hunter Arms […]

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L.C. Smith shotguns get bad raps. Cracked stocks – that’s the most common criticism you’ll here about them. Finicky single triggers – that’s the other complaint people bring up all the time. While there’s some truth to these charges, the really only apply the post-1913 LCs. Before then, these side-by-side were much more trouble free. […]

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Old age is one of the drawbacks of American side by sides. This country’s golden age of side-by-sides was pretty much over by the mid 1920s. By the time prohibition was repealed in ’33, our shotguns of choice had single barrels and pump-style actions. This means most of the doubles we come across today by […]

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I like 12 gauge side-by-sides. Size wise, they feel right to me. Unlike 20s, the bbls and stocks on 12 gauge fit well in my hands. I also like the versatility of the larger gauge. With the right loads, my go-to 12 gauge can handle everything from woodcock to wild pheasants. Of course, twelves can […]

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High grade L.C. Smiths side-by-sides are some of the nicest double barrels ever made in America. Just check out this 12 gauge No. 5 to see what I mean. In their 1900 catalog, the Hunter Arm Company wrote that the L.C. Smith No. 5 was designed for shooters “in need of a gun handsomely finished […]

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