Take a look at these Portugese Pointers…

Portugese Pointer, from Craig Koshyk
Portugese Pointer, from Craig Koshyk

The Portugese Pointer is not a hunting dog you see every day (at least not in the US). Craig Koshyk has written extensively about these dogs in this book Pointing Dogs Volume One: The Continentals. He’s also posted a bit about them here at his Pointing Dog Blog.

Check out this video to see what these dogs look like in action:

Another great Guyot side-by-side shotgun….

12 gauge Guyot double barrel sidelock shotgun
12 gauge Guyot double barrel sidelock shotgun

I’m a big fan of Guyot shotguns, and I’ve written about these doubles here, here, and here. Just about every Guyot side-by-side that I’ve seen has been very well made, from the lower-end boxlocks to the top-of-line sidelocks.

The sidelock here is an another example of just how much skill went into Guyot’s best double barrel shotguns. It was auctioned off last year and went for a very fair at a great price. I wish I had been the person who got it. Here’s the auctioneer’s full listing on it:

46. Very fine French Sidelock Double Ejector Shotgun by Guyot of Paris

12 gauge Guyot double barrel sidelock shotgun
12 gauge Guyot double barrel sidelock shotgun

Serial #12451, 12 bore, 29 1/2″ barrels are choked improved cylinder and modified and show bright excellent bores.  The shotgun features ejectors, cocking indicators, articulated front trigger, sideclips and non-automatic safety. The action and locks feature full coverage rose and scroll engraving with “N. GUYOT” on left lock and “A PARIS” on right lock. The barrel rib is engraved “Sir Joseph Whitworth’s Fluid Comressed Steel” and the barrels are marked “N. Guyot Arqr. Paris / 12 Rue de Ponthieu”.

12 gauge Guyot double barrel sidelock shotgun
12 gauge Guyot double barrel sidelock shotgun

The barrels retain 95% superb quality blued finish that appears original. The barrels feature their original French proofs and have been additionally proofed in England “12 ga / 70mm / 850 BAR”. The action and locks retain 80% original color case-hardened finish with most loss on belly where colors are blending with a pleasing smooth gray patina. The triggerguard retains about 60% thinning original blue finish. The checkered straight grip buttstock and splinter forend are of beautifully figured French walnut and rate excellent plus and may have been lightly cleaned with freshened checkering.

The shotgun locks up very tight and points beautifully with a 14 5/8″ pull over a later leather covered pad with drops of 1 1/2″ and 2 1/8″. A very fine, best quality Parisian double gun of superlative quality. (Estimate: $8000/12,000) SOLD FOR $9200.00.

12 gauge Guyot double barrel sidelock shotgun
12 gauge Guyot double barrel sidelock shotgun

Breed of the Week: the Bracco Italiano…

Bracco Italiano, from Pointing Dogs, Volume One: The Continentals, by Craig Koshyk
Bracco Italiano, from Pointing Dogs, Volume One: The Continentals, by Craig Koshyk

Bracco Italianos are an odd breed. Big boned, and with a large heads, drooping jowls and flopping ears, Braccos looks more bloodhound than bird dog. Because they’re so rare here in the States, very few of us will ever have the experience it takes to appreciate them.

The Italians have been breeding some kind of Bracco Ialiano for several hundred years. In Pointing Dogs: Volume One, The Continentals, Craig Koshyk does an fantastic job of laying out this history. In this post on his Pointing Dog Blog, he talks about what of the things that makes that has always set the Bracco Italiano apart from other continental pointers. It’s their gait.

Bracco Italiano, from Pointing Dogs, Volume One: The Continentals, by Craig Koshyk
Bracco Italiano, from Pointing Dogs, Volume One: The Continentals, by Craig Koshyk

Braccos are trotters, and in the field they move in a very distinct way. Rather than pressing forward and bounding like a English Pointer, Braccos stride, head high, and back level and straight. All the action takes place in their legs, and when they get up to speed, they like they’re floating across the field. Check out the videos below to get a better sense of what I mean.

 

Style…

When it comes to bird dogs, different breeds hunt in different ways. This is especially true with Continental and English Pointers.

Last weekend when I was out with Bob I had a chance to see these differences in action. Check out these videos to see what a mean.

This is my English Pointer, Puck. Check out how high she holds her head. She’s also a bit rangier and more dynamic in the field.

This is Bob’s GSP Nelly. She’s an easy-handling, closer ranging bird dog. Check out how she holds her head lower and looks for scent closer to the ground. Her body tends to “rocking horse” a bit.

Where Pointers Come from, Part 2…

Pointing Dogs: Volume One, The Continentals
Pointing Dogs: Volume One, The Continentals

The story of pointing dogs is full of half truths,  distortions, and outright lies. Craig Koshyk has dedicated thousands of hours separating fact from fiction, and he put it all together in his excellent book Pointing Dogs: Volume One, The Continentals.

Here’s the intro:

“The French revolution began in 1789. When it was Over 11 years later, Napoleon was in power and nearly every aspect of French life, including hunting and dog breeding, had changed forever. Some of the changes were positive. The revolution had given the average French citizen the right to hunt. But for the dogs kept in the kennels 
of aristocrats, the revolution spelled disaster. Many were slaughtered outright and others were stolen, but most were simply released to roam the countryside….”

You can read the rest of the story here, in The History of Pointing Dogs Part 2: Progress. And you can read part 1 of the story here.

Breed of the week: The Portugese Pointer…

The English Pointer lays claim to ancestors throughout Europe. Dogs from Spain are said to be the beginning of the breed, and an earlier version of  the modern Portugese Pointer probably added a few bricks to the EP’s foundation.

Portugese Pointer, from Pointing Dogs, Volume One: The Continentals
Portugese Pointer, from Pointing Dogs, Volume One: The Continentals

Portugese Pointers can be traced back to the 18th century and today, these hard hunting, short haired dogs are still chasing game. Craig Koshyk tells their story here and in his book Pointing Dog, Volume One : The Continentals.

Pics courtesy Craig Koshyk. All rights reserved.

Portugese Pointer, from Pointing Dogs, Volume One: The Continentals
Portugese Pointer, from Pointing Dogs, Volume One: The Continentals

 

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